Wednesday, September 07, 2005

What about other misdemeanors?

The Strib reports today on an illegal immigrant who's taking full advantage of the court system designed to send him home:
A young Mexican [illegal - ed, chachi] immigrant who was discovered squatting at Apple Valley High School last winter has been ordered to leave the country.

An immigration judge this morning ordered Francisco Javier Serrano to depart within 120 days, but Serrano's attorney said he plans to pursue several routes of appeal.

"There are still a lot of maneuvers we can make here to make this young man's dream come true," said Herbert Igbanugo, his attorney. "We have not given up the fight."

He said he plans to appeal the local immigration district director's Tuesday's refusal to grant his client "non-immigrant student status," which would allow Serrano to legally stay in the United States.

Igbanugo also will move to reopen Serrano's case if he can determine if his father has legal immigration status, which also would open the door for him to legally stay here.

If Serrano has to leave on Jan. 5, it will be less than three weeks shy of a year since he was discovered at the school, setting off a news media frenzy.
Entering the United States illegally is a misdemeanor. So is driving drunk. Let's imagine instead this were a case of drunken driving, substituting it for 'immigration' in the above story and modifying some of the details for clarity, in order to highlight the silliness of the lengths at which people will go to make sure criminal behavior has an out.
A young drunk driver who was discovered sitting in his car in an Apple Valley High School last winter has been ordered to jail.

A traffic judge this morning ordered a Very White Straight Male to jail within 120 days, but Whitey's attorney said he plans to pursue several routes of appeal.

"There are still a lot of maneuvers we can make here to make this young man's dream of staying out of jail a reality," said Herbert Igbanugo, his attorney. "We have not given up the fight. Whitey didn't mean any harm, he just wanted to get home, get to bed, so he could get up and work really, really hard."

He said he plans to appeal the local law enforcement district director's Tuesday's refusal to grant his client "non-sobriety status," which would allow Whitey to legally stay out of jail.

Igbanugo also will move to reopen Whitey's case if he can determine if his father has gotten away with driving under the influence, which also would open the door for him to legally stay out of jail.

If Whitey has to leave on Jan. 5, it will be less than three weeks shy of a year since he was discovered at the school, setting off a inexplicable news media frenzy that makes one question why lawyers are willing to work pro bono in order to get their guilty clients acquitted.
Wow, that does sound ridiculous now that I re-read it. Such is our legal system. You'd better take a side because you're paying for it Minnesota.

free web counters
Blue Nile Diamonds